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Category Archives: Special Snowflake Syndrome

The Snowflake Test

A few weeks ago, I stumbled across a New Boston Post article by someone named Kyle Reyes – President and CEO of The Silent Partner Marketing – that explained his firm’s somewhat unorthodox hiring practices. You see, The Silent Partner Marketing is apparently a pretty cool place to work. They have a bar, they have a personal trainer, they allow dogs – YES DOGS!!!! – in the office, which should actually alleviate stress levels and increase productivity. (Yes, I speak from experience. We employed a wounded warrior at my old job, who had an adorable German Shepherd seeing eye pup, and who acted as our office therapy dog whenever he didn’t have his harness on.) So being a cool place to work, the company obviously gets a lot of interest from prospective employees, who find the benefits appealing.

So how does a company ensure they hire the best and brightest, whose personality fits the culture?

I know what it’s like to have to wade through hundreds of resumes. Whenever my office advertises a position, we drown in a swamp of resumes – some stellar, and others… well… they might as well be written in crayon. I know we’re a great place to work, but it seems these days applicants think we need to sell ourselves to them, because they’re so smart/experienced/fabulous. Sometimes it takes all my will power not to remind the applicant that with the pay and benefits we offer, as well as the fascinating work that actually makes a difference, they should be the ones selling themselves to us. More often than not, the attitude is, “show me how great you are, and that you deserve me!”

NEWSFLASH, SNOWFLAKE! We are not here to impress you. We pay good money for good skills. We hire quality people and reward them accordingly, and we screen heavily to ensure said quality. Don’t like it? Don’t apply! We are certainly not here to adjust to your whims.

Since I can’t very well inform prospective applicants that they won’t be issued safe spaces, pussy hats, safety pins, and free days off to focus on their political activism, I weed out potential snowflakes by informing them of the true benefits of working in my office.

You get to do a truly fascinating job that allows you to challenge your assumptions and stretch your mental muscles.

No, you don’t get a masseuse or your own office, but we do have a table filled with chocolate, cookies, and all sorts of treats people bring – especially when they go TDY to a faraway place! And we do get to travel! Places like Germany, Singapore, Britain, Luxembourg, and Romania are just some of the neat places we’ve been able to send our employees! And yes, you need to learn customs and courtesies. And no, you don’t get to indulge your “I only eat organically-grown, locally sourced produce that certifies it wasn’t mean to animals” predilections. You will be polite to your hosts, always be on time, always keep situational awareness, and act like a grownup, or you don’t get to go again. Believe me, I’ve done it.

You do get to interact with senior policy makers, and keep them informed about critical issues that impact this nation. No, you don’t get to choose what you brief or how you brief it. No, you don’t get to decline because you don’t like a particular policy maker. No, you don’t get to shove your own political views into your analysis. You will, however, become a subject matter expert on various issues that are vital to our foreign policy and national security, and you will develop your knowledge and expertise. I call that self-fulfillment. You like it? Come show me why I should hire you for this unique opportunity! I won’t coddle you, but I will teach you and guide you, and I will make you the best you can be at your job.

Interested?

But back to Kyle Reyes.

When I read Reyes’ strategy for weeding out those who don’t quite fit the corporate culture at his company, I nearly squeaked with excitement! He calls it “The Snowflake Test.” Since he published an article about “The Snowflake Test,” it’s gone viral. I’ve seen him on the news, and he’s been on a ton of various radio programs!

I sent Reyes a note shortly after the first article was published with a short kudos for his work. He was kind enough to respond, and we had a brief conversation in which I conveyed to him how much I wished I could administer his “Snowflake Test” to those who apply for open positions with me!

Some of the questions are somewhat eclectic.

  1. When was the last time you cried and why? (At my son’s Army Basic Training graduation. Tears of joy)
  2. You arrive at an event for work and there’s a major celebrity you’ve always wanted to meet. What happens next? (I do my job. Duh.)
  3. What’s your favorite kind of adult beverage? (Bloody Mary)

Others are obviously designed to gauge your respect for the views and beliefs of others or your love of this country.

  1. How do you feel about guns? (I carry an M1911. My G23 is my other carry pistol.)
  2. What are your feelings about employees or clients carrying guns? (None of my business as long as they practice common sense safety.)
  3. What does America mean to you? (*Long discussion about the opportunities this nation provided me – ones I couldn’t get as a Jew in the former USSR*)
  4. How do you feel about police? (Much like I feel about others who stand up. Thank you for what you do. Thank you for your sacrifices. Your badge doesn’t come with a halo, however, so don’t abuse your authority.)

Still others take a peek at your personality and try to gauge how you would perform your duties in a marketing firm.

  1. What’s the best way to communicate with clients? (Politely, respectfully, but honestly and directly.)
  2. In a creative environment like The Silent Partner Marketing, what do you envision work attire looking like? (As long as you don’t come in with piercings all over your face, wearing leather chaps, no pants, and a tiara, I don’t care. Dress professionally. It doesn’t have to be a three-piece suit all the time, but if you come in wearing pajama bottoms and a torn t-shirt with fuzzy bunny slippers, I’ll personally escort you out.)
  3. Should “trigger warnings” be issued before we release content for clients or the company that might be considered “controversial”? (Nope. You hire us for our expertise and reputation. If you don’t trust us to release the very best content for your needs, maybe you should find someone else.)

Reyes apparently got a lot of flak from the very snowflakes he wants to avoid for weeding them out in such a rude and undignified fashion! After all, they shouldn’t be subjected to these intrusive questions or judged by their answers! They’re perfect candidates! They deserve an interview. They bring a lot to the table, and because they’re so special and perfect, the employer needs to sell the company to them. They’re special! They’re quality! How DARE he want to hire the best candidate possible for openings in his own company! Reyes’ attitude toward these entitled buffoons is the same as mine would be.

I was scolded by a woman on the phone yesterday who told me she wouldn’t take the test and “shame” on me for making people take a test to come work for us.  She “demanded” I remove the test or risk losing out on “perfect employees” like herself.

Bummer.

Well, snowflake, it’s back to the heaping pile of applications for me.

I would probably send the woman a photo of her application in my circular file, because I’m not as nice as Kyle Reyes.

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Yes, People are Stupid

shirtIf you haven’t heard, there’s another “The Walking Dead” controversy brewing. Because perpetually offended, howling snowflakes have apparently run out of things about which to be outraged, they are now screeching about a T-Shirt. Thankfully, the shrieking outragery is in the UK… for now. But there are almost certainly aggrieved social justice zealots in the United States who are standing in solidarity with their squealing comrades in the UK in their indignation. Hell, I’ve seen quite a few of them on social media!

The “offensive” language revolves around TWD baddie Negan’s use of the old rhyme “Eeny meeny miny moe, catch a tiger by the toe…” to select the victim he would violently bash over the head with his trusted, barbed-wire baseball bat Lucille..

Now, when I was a kid, we used that rhyme all the time. Most Americans, I would wager, are not and have never been aware of the rhyme’s history, which apparently used the N-bomb instead of “tiger.” I certainly had no idea. But apparently, that’s what it was, and because most of us didn’t know about the rhyme’s history, we’re obviously steeped in white privilege… or something.

Yeah, I know. I had black friends in school, and when we used the rhyme, none of them were insulted, probably because like most Americans, they had no idea about the rhyme’s history.

But in their search for things to get offended about the SJW howler monkeys have now decided to target the TWD t-shirt.

It doesn’t matter that the show is not even close to racist.

It doesn’t matter that Negan ever used the word, and has never, as a character, been shown to be racist in any way.

It doesn’t matter that the show’s and comic book’s creators almost certainly didn’t know the rhyme’s history and meant exactly zero connotations to be gleaned from Negan’s taunts.

And it certainly doesn’t matter that the alleged “insult” wasn’t aimed at anyone.

You see, intent doesn’t matter, because according to one zealot, “the people at the tail end of the insult are the ones who get to decide if it’s offensive.”

Which basically means that anything we do or say can be constituted as offensive to someone.

Which essentially surpasses “thought crime” and lands directly into “insensitivity crime.”

morganLiterally stupidest claim ever.

TWD’s Jeffrey Dean Morgan agrees, this is stupid, and I can’t blame him.

A rhyme that’s been used for decades, and apparently at some point (in the 1800s) contained a word that was common then, but we now  – after more than 100 fucking years – find unacceptable. A t-shirt that doesn’t even contain that line. A show that is in no way racist. A scene that in no way had racial connotations.

Imbeciles are literally getting offended at a t-shirt referring to a fictional character’s use of a rhyme that more than 100 years ago contained a word that was commonly-used then, but that is considered unacceptable now, that the t-shirt doesn’t even contain.

And apparently, it doesn’t matter if no insult was actually intended, that the rhyme wasn’t hurled at anyone, because the only thing that matters is pwecious feewings.

And if you disagree, you’re wrong.

If you refuse to bow down to the subjective snowflakery and confirm that what you say and what you mean doesn’t matter, but what the grievance mongers claim offends them does, you’re a racist… or privileged… or something.

The content of the rhyme doesn’t matter. The indisputable fact that the rhyme as said by a fictional character did not contain any racially charged language doesn’t matter. The fact that the majority of people involved with the show, with the manufacture of the shirt and its sale, and in the world writ large, were not aware of the rhyme’s history doesn’t matter.

What matters to these whining, sniveling fucktards is that their subjective feelings be accepted as fact, because apparently, their offense somehow gives them moral superiority over the rest of us.

Yeah. stupid.

Nope. I refuse to play these games. It’s an intellectual (or in this case, sub-intellectual) trap that marginalizes everyone except those seeking indignation and gives them license to accuse anyone and everyone of facism/racism/sexism/*insert ism here, regardless of whether their interlocutors really are guilty of fitting those descriptions. It allows the perpetually affronted to offend, denigrate, and demean anyone they don’t like merely by claiming offense. And yes, I find it insulting and and downright abusive to be called those things – especially since I’ve spent my life fighting them.

There’s no justice in this – social or otherwise. It’s a disgusting, biased, discriminatory retaliation tactic against those whom the snowflakes seek to marginalize – those evil, cis/het, white people, whom they believe to be deserving of retribution for the “crime” of being privileged. And while they treat the rest of us like something smelly that attached itself to the bottom of their shoes, they treat minorities like fragile morons, who have to be protected from anything that can even remotely be viewed as “offensive.” Dog forbid someone’s delicate labia get chafed – even unintentionally! MICROAGGRESSION!

Here’s an idea, snowflakes: go fuck yourselves. With a barbed-wire bat. There is no “right” not to be offended.

Salon Shrewsplains Paella

paellaSome screeching, cunt-chafed harridan at Salon recently took to the Interwebz to shrewsplain to us why celebrities making paella in the wrong dish is apparently cultural appropriation. Mireia Triguero Roura sniffily tells us that while we were enjoying “unnecessarily gigantic meals” in our homes over the holidays (because she and her band of unshaven, rainbow-haired, perpetually offended harpies are ultimately the arbiters of what is necessary and what isn’t in other people’s lives), actor Rob Schneider was committing an act of nefarious cultural appropriation against Spain in his own home.

Spaniards were outraged. Some replied with angry, insulting tweets. Many sent pictures of their own paellas as inspiration. Others created fake, outrageous variations on the classic hot dog. A Spanish chef kindly took it upon himself to show the American actor what paella is and what it isn’t. For some hours, this became a trending topic in some regions in Spain. Schneider finally apologized and vowed to try to make it again, with all the new paella knowledge forced on to him through social media.

Massive raw lobster tails aside, Spaniards were reacting to what they felt was cultural appropriation of their cuisine.

Spaniards are certainly very proud of their cuisine, and we can be regionalists to a fault. No two towns can fully agree on what exactly you need to put in a paella. Some argue that onions give it the better flavor, but many will say that there is no place for them in the dish. Some take their issue with peas and fava beans, and others have unearthed family recipes going back to the 19th century to show that snails have a place on the rice. But small battles aside, there’s one thing everyone can agree on, and that is that one must cook paella in, well, a paella pan.

That’s right. Rob Schneider insensitively put stuff that he likes in his paella – in his own home – using the WRONG. FUCKING. PAN. – using ingredients he liked – and Spaniards lost their collective shit. Perhaps they should worry more about their abominable more than 18 percent unemployment rate, rather than soil themselves on Twitter because some celebrity posted a picture of his dinner, but that’s none of my business.

But then we have this Mireia Triguero Roura explaining just why it’s so offensive to cook what you want and how you want it in your own home, and I have to once again point to the fact that this cultural appropriation and perpetual offense garbage has jumped the shark. Hard.

The shallow and wide pan, with two handles in opposite sides, gives the name to this rice dish. And to some extent any rice dish cooked on such pan could qualify to be a paella. So even if we take this very low bar for defining paella, Schneider’s dish failed the test. As a twitter user pointed out he just made “rice with things,” or perhaps more accurately, things with rice.

Well… technically, that’s what paella is – rice with things. There’s vegetable paella. There’s seafood paella. There’s chicken paella, meat paella, mixed paella, you name it! There are also green beans, artichokes, and peppers – all depends on how you want to make it. So yeah – it’s rice with things, no matter how much snobbery you want to inject into your criticism.

To Schneider’s credit, where could he have turned to for a paella recipe that wouldn’t have infuriated most Spaniards? Just a few months ago, the famous chef Jamie Oliver failed the paella test again when he proposed a recipe that not only was again not made in the proper pan, but it also added something no Spaniard has ever seen in paella: chorizo. Just like Schneider, Oliver received his fair share of criticism on social media, and even newspapers reported the story as some outrageous insult to Spanish culture.

And why should Schneider give a shit if something he makes in his own home, for his friends and family, that he will consume “infuriates” anyone? Is he trying to sell it? No. Is he a chef in a Spanish restaurant? No. He’s a celebrity who posted a picture of his fucking dinner. Get over yourselves.

But unlike Schneider, Oliver is a chef, and a widely recognized one. So people will turn to him for advice. What are a celebrity chef’s responsibilities when writing a recipe for a dish that hails from a different cultural tradition than their own? How much should they stay close to the original dish and how much room do they have to be as creative as they want to be?

A chef is an artist with food. His only responsibility is to his customers, who will either love or hate his dish. He certainly has no responsibility to ask permission from the perpetually aggrieved about how he chooses to create. If they don’t like it, you know what they can do? Not spend money in his restaurant. Not buy the dish.

Did the Moors in ancient Spain, who began cultivating rice around the 10th century ask the Chinese in the Pearl River valley region who originated rice for permission to cultivate rice and use it in their dishes how they wished?

Did the Spaniards, who imported pepper seeds from Mexico in the 15th century ask them for permission to use them in their national dishes?

Saffron, a common spice in paella, is native to Southwest Asia and was likely cultivated in or near Greece. I don’t see the Greeks flinging “cultural appropriation” turds at the Spaniards for using that particular spice in their paella.

Food evolves, much like other art. Chefs explore new flavors, new spices, and new ingredients to make tasty dishes that stand out to their customers. Countries import various fruits, vegetables, and spices, and create new, interesting, innovative meals that vary with each individual palettes.

I’m guessing Mireia Triguero Roura is not that adventurous, nor is she open minded enough to understand diversity in that context, because when faced with a lack of things to be outraged about, these nags must dig deep to keep the indignation alive.

And she admits it.

It is hard to talk about cultural appropriation in food. For one, most cuisines have been developed as a result of the influences of many peoples, and hail from particular territories rather than countries.

Then perhaps she should stop talking about cultural appropriation in food. But no, she wastes many more paragraphs doing just that in the most inane, imbecilic manner!

A quick browse through the big food magazines in English reveals that virtually all have at least one paella recipe that includes chorizo—and most include other big no-nos among paella chefs. But most of them fail to mention that “chorizo” cannot be found in the dish in Spain. And in fact, most Spaniards felt even disgusted by the thought of it.

So what? Does that mean that others aren’t free to enjoy chorizo in their paella? Normal people just let others enjoy what they like, as long as it doesn’t infringe on their right to do the same. But apparently certain Special Snowflakes™ in Spain are unable to allow others to simply enjoy their own creations, so they have to destroy everyone else’s happiness, because it’s the only way they can validate their sad existences.

And yet if the nature of paella changes regionally inside Spain (even inside Valencia region), why should we allow those discrepancies only inside the borders of Spain? Shouldn’t we embrace, as David Rosengarten suggested in a Saveur article, the “changing nature of the dish” and “focus on the singular pleasure of eating it” instead? One could argue it should be a source of pride to see your cuisine become a source of inspiration for many around the world.

Unless one is a pretentious fuck weasel, in which case one writes entire articles waxing hysterical about “cultural appropriation.”

But at the heart of Spaniards’ battle to keep chorizo out of paellas around the world is the sense of protecting a sacred identity.

Sacred identity? What sort of fuckery is this? It’s food, ferpetessake! It’s rice mixed with olive oil, some veggies, spices, and proteins! It’s not like it came out of the Virgin Mary’s untapped asshole. It’s FOOD! Get over yourselves!

Earlier this year at Oberlin College, some students protested against a coleslaw and pulled-pork sandwich that was being sold under the name “banh mi,” which is a Vietnamese sandwich consisting of none of those ingredients.

manateeWell, color me shocked! Oberlin students – the mental institution that spawned the feminazi, child molesting landwhale Lena Dunham – are protesting something?

Take, however, two of the big immigrant cuisines in the U.S.: Mexican and Italian. Arguably, tacos ordered in Texas are quite different from a carnitas taco found in Jalisco. And “marinara” sauce in the United States has come to mean a whole different world from the original Italian word. But unlike Mexican-American and Italian-American food in the U.S., which are the result of large populations of immigrants settling in the country and bringing with them their food and recipes and adapting both to the ingredients and the palates of the land, the chorizo-paella (or the Oberlin “banh mi”) seems rather the result of non-Spanish chefs in a test kitchen deciding what belongs in a dish with what seems like little research or respect to the country of origin. And unlike most creations that are a result of culinary cross-pollination (think: the ramen burger), no one is changing the name to suggest this is a new creation. (I suggest we call this “choriella” from “chorizo” and “paella”).

So ultimately, what Mireia Triguero Roura is offended by is the word “paella.” Just like any other Special Snowflake™ she just haz teh sadz that someone has the temerity to use a word with which she disagrees to describe something as basic as food, made by someone other than she and her band of perpetually aggrieved shrews find acceptable, and therefore, since her delicate labia are bruised by mere words, she can’t help but publicly shame them for it. Nagging – it’s like Vagisil for the SJW soul.

Krishnendu Ray, a New York University professor of food studies, argues in “The Ethnic Restaurateur” that white chefs have more freedom to play with other people’s food than chefs of color do, which creates an inherent inequality in the field. To that, I would add that in a world where most people turn to the Internet to find recipes — and English is the de facto lingua franca of the online world — English-speaking chefs not only have more freedom to play around, but they also have the power to ultimately transform traditional dishes from other countries, without so much as an acknowledgement.

And of course, no Salon article would be complete without quoting some obscure, perpetually victimized “professor” of food studies, claiming “white privilege,” to give the drivel what passes for gravitas in the world of the culture jihadists.

Outrage? Check.

Cultural appropriation? Check.

White privilege? Check.

Ah! The recipe for progtard butthurt is complete!

Now, go enjoy your paella, heathens! Add some corn, tuna, and mayonnaise to it, and microwave it on high. And don’t forget to post a photo on Twitter and brag about your paella attempt, to really give this squealing nag something to gripe about!

What in the blue hell?

GenderPronounPinsI’ve been pretty busy lately between work and physical therapy, so I missed this from a couple of days ago. But I had to post this before I got involved with other things and forgot. I think we’ve reached the point of diminishing returns with this gender pronoun bullshit, people! This is no longer about being inclusive. It’s more about catering to attention whoring snowflakes, who want to be special and different, but don’t have the imagination, ambition, or skill to create something unique.

Instead they simply pick something stupid and easy that gives them a) attention and b) grounds to complain about mistreatment if their pronoun is misused in some way. That way they can feel important if some cisheterowhiteracistoppressor is relieved of his job for failing to recognize that today they identify as a feather duster.

And here is the result.

In an effort to become more inclusive for gender nonconforming students, Champlain College handed out hundreds of pronoun pins to students and faculty during first-year orientation.

The pins contain a number of preferential pronouns, including “she/her,” “he/him,” “xe/xer,” and even pins that read “Hello, my pronouns are fluid. Please ask me!”

Could this be any more painfully stupid?

Alright, bitches. For the next several days I identify as a Mustang – the car, not the mammal. Red. Manual transmission. Y’all better refer to me as zhe/zher and worship me like any dick mobile should be worshiped. If you don’t, I’ll whine loudly and complain that you’re oppressing me.

Got it?

Good.

Special Snowflakes Find Out Their Fuckery Doesn’t Fly in the Real World

And they find out the hard way.

snowflake 2If you don’t feel like reading the entire story linked, here’s a short version:

Special snowflake gets internship at a firm that requires employees to dress professionally.

Special snowflake notices one member of the firm wearing shoes that don’t conform to dress code.

Special snowflake gets bent out of shape, because someone is violating dress code with apparent impunity, and approaches manager to ask if the interns could violate dress code too.

Special snowflake’s request is denied.

Special snowflake can’t take no for an answer, and writes a proposal/petition, signed by other special snowflake interns, telling the management why they should be allowed to violate company policy.

All special snowflakes who signed the petition get tossed out on their entitled asses.

Isn’t it amazing when the special snowflakes get into the real world outside their university safe spaces and discover that the real world doesn’t care about their special snowflakery? Rough lesson, boys and girls, but one you should take to heart.

The advice columnist is correct in her response.

Y’all were pretty out of line. You were interns there — basically guests for the summer. Their rules are their rules. This is like being a houseguest and presenting your host with a signed petition (!) to change their rules about cleaning up after yourself. You just don’t have the standing to do that.

Over the past couple of years, we’ve seen Special Snowflakes demand extra time to do their schoolwork, because it interferes with their activism. We’ve seen them violently demand that their opposition be silenced and even deprived of employment! We’ve seen them demand safe spaces and participation trophies. They want passing grades just for breathing and excused delays in examinations, because they’re just too stressed about the perceived injustices they face in this world to study! And universities, in their blinding ignorance, have genuflected in front of these overindulged piglets and bent over backwards to accommodate them for fear of being branded racist, misogynist, or any other offensive “ist” you can think of!

Well, guess what, snowflakes!

That’s not how the real world works.

No one believes you’re special or important because today you identify as a demigender toaster!

An internship is supposed to provide you with an opportunity to learn and get real world experience! You’re certainly not doing anyone a favor by gracing them with your presence, no matter what mommy and daddy told you when they gave you that pony! The work you do will determine your value to the company that affords you said opportunity. They are your host. They are kind enough to take you on and show you the ropes. They certainly don’t need your privileged, disgruntled whining about being forced to wear leather shoes! You don’t like it? Get the fuck out! Your internship is a gift to no one but you, and if you’re extremely lucky,sometimes you’ll even get paid for the opportunity!

snowflakeA workplace is not a democracy. A workplace is not a “safe space.” Your manager does not owe you an explanation about why a certain full-time employee may or may not be exempt from a stated workplace policy. And they certainly don’t need a bunch of puerile brats organizing what amounts to a mini protest of policies they don’t like. Your manager is not your friend, parent, or nanny. A workplace is where you learn practical experience in your chosen career, and perhaps, if you really do your job well, you will have an opportunity to join the workforce as a full, productive member!

Oh, and by the way, the person who was “violating” the dress code was a Soldier who had lost her leg! So yes, she was allowed to wear whatever shoes she wanted. What’s really telling is that special snowflake, instead of acknowledging that perhaps interns have no place informing management who, in their view, should be allowed to wear whatever they wanted, claims they would have taken the Soldier’s predicament into consideration when making their recommendations!

What?

Who in the blinding, sniveling fuck should care about what a bunch of sniveling millennials recommend as a dress code at a firm whose leadership quite obviously knows better what kind of image it wants to project? Do special snowflake and her whining cohorts really consider themselves that important?

My friend Amanda has it exactly right in her post about this very same subject this morning. The entire letter shows that special snowflake doesn’t understand what she did wrong. She thinks the interns are somehow higher on the food chain than they actually are, and further believes that the management ought to reconsider their firing!

The selfish, entitled brattery is nauseating! Amanda also notes that special snowflake appears to only be concerned with her own dismissal and not that of her fellow interns, even though she organized this mini-mutiny, and if she had any integrity at all, would hold herself responsible.

She mentions how professionally the proposal was written – just like she was taught at school!

Perhaps her school should have taught her the value of professional conduct, instead of coddling and telling her how special and important she is!

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