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Professor will study Snowflakery

Mary Atwater, a science and mathematics education professor at the University of Georgia will be studying microaggressions. That’s right. You read that correctly. Microaggressions.

At your expense.

The National Science Foundation has awarded Atwater more than $200,000 of taxpayer money to study butthurt – perceived infractions by the perpetually aggrieved that allow them to claim others’ fault for their failures.

This “high risk-high payoff” approach to supporting new, exploratory work will allow Mary Atwater, a professor in the mathematics and science education department in the College of Education, to develop a potentially transformative venue for reducing racial microaggression, or the subtle, indirect or unintentional discrimination against members of a marginalized group, in science education.

You see, promoting STEM education among minorities is insufficient, so this creature was awarded taxpayer money to find fault with white people for low minority participation in STEM fields.

Never mind that minority participation in STEM fields has been on the rise since 1991.

Let’s put aside the fact that the NSF itself acknowledged that one of the most effective ways to allay some of the apprehensions minorities have with regard to STEM fields is to provide coursework in middle and high school to give students a sense of what STEM courses entail at the college level.

Peter Arcidiacono, an economics professor at Duke University who has studied STEM degree completion rates, cited the need for a better sense of the workload involved with STEM majors.

“Students — both minority and not — don’t know that the sciences require more study time on average and give out lower grades,” says Arcidiacono. “Hence, many students start out in the sciences, both minority and not, but switch out.

“Those with worse preparation switch out at higher rates regardless of race,” Arcidiacono adds.

But no. Atwater seems to think that the reason for lower minority participation in STEM fields is because minorities are perpetually aggrieved snowflakes who apparently see racism and discrimination everywhere, and are failing because they’re just too upset to study… or something.

“This grant can have an impact on the number of African-American and Latino/a faculty members we have in science education,” Atwater claims.

Really? Handing her taxpayer dollars to study ways to to blame normal people for offending sensitive, perpetually aggrieved snowflakes – whether intentionally or not – will impact the number of minorities in science education? My guess is they’ll just find something else to get all butthurt about.

Hell, if I were a black or Hispanic person, I’d be offended by the mere suggestion that I’m too delicate to finish my studies because some white person unintentionally triggered my by asking where I was from!

But apparently, in today’s world, it’s en vogue to blame others for your failures – academic or otherwise – because no one wants to actually assume responsibility for anything.

Sure, it’s much easier to blame others for your shortcomings.

Sure it’s fashionable to play victim and demand compensation because of others who ostensibly didn’t take your precious feelings into consideration in the form of special privileges.

Sure it’s all the rage to blame your deficiencies on someone who offended your tender labia by assuming you were female, because your tits were falling out of your shirt, or someone who had the balls to show interest in you by asking where you were from.

But guess what! Creating blame for uber chafed cunt cakes’ failures to live in the real world and deal with other people as adults and getting taxpayer money for it? That’s a no-go in my book!

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27 responses

  1. Larry Mitchell | Reply

    There really are two nations within the US and one is composed of profound idiots. When did the normal course of education become a Douglas Adams gag. And that was intended rhetorically.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s the nation of Retardia.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Yes, and sometimes it seems to have 350 electoral votes.

        Like

  2. STEM fields are supposed to be non- snowflake fields.
    I don’t want some snowflake getting passing grades for shit they can’t even begin to comprehend because I don’t want snowflakes to get engineering degrees when most couldn’t pass high school geometry or calculus or algebra.
    I’ve hired college kids as laborers- and had to teach then how to read a freakin tape measure.
    And how to set up and level a transit-and these kids were going to be engineers?
    You should try explaining to one of them the reasons you have to have 2/3 of the joists for a cantilevered deck or room anchored to the floor joists and can only have 1/3 of the lenght extending out from wall of house.
    They think you can just bolt a 10× 12 deck to the band joist and it will support itself deck chairs and people.
    That was just a simple example- try teaching them floor loads, how much snow load a roof can take etc.
    I had exactly one kid in the past 7 or 8 years who comprehended why homes and buildings are built the way they are.
    At least the ones that are built right.
    No snowflakes should be allowed in engineering- snowflakes in other STEM fields is even scarier.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. NOTHING is scarier than a snowflake engineer. In software development, their shit doesn’t work and they get fired. Worst case, part of the budget gets blown. In engineering people can die. I actually have had a new engineer tell me they don’t want a job where they have to wear a hard hat. This was a guy bitching about our growing machinery company that was bringing safety standards up to where they should already have been. As a developer I was already wearing a hat while on the floor, partly because I knew he was around and didn’t give a crap.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Snowflake at a nuclear power plant, hired for a quota. But yes, I wouldn’t want my house built by one of those people.

        Like

  3. The ASVAB for 6th graders!
    Grunts to the left, drivers to the right. derp

    Like

  4. my prediction of the study results:

    it WON’T say…

    “microaggressions are part of the end result of children being told they are special snowflakes for the last twenty years”

    Liked by 3 people

  5. I am very tired of the entire snowflake clan. This link to an article about the current Miss USA, a lovely, intelligent young black woman whose field is nuclear science and who encourages kids to GO INTO STEM studies, is the exact opposite of the self-centered little snotflakes.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/entertainthis/2017/05/15/miss-usa-kara-mccullough-under-fire-conservative-answers-healthcare-feminism/101702924/

    But apparently, her answers to the competition questions made the snowflakes unhappy as all getout. Still, she stuck to her guns. Good for her.

    Liked by 4 people

  6. Purdue University just hired a new female dean in the engineering department who wants to emphasize the feminine way of doing engineering. We are all looking forward to that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. And what, pray-tell is the “feminine” way of doing engineering?

      Do I even want to know?

      Like

      1. feminine engineering: Find some guy to fix it.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. More ‘organic’ structures, which don’t use physics, because physics, logic, engineering and maths are patriarchal and oppressive? That’s my guess anyway. Oh, and more ‘biofriendly’ and ‘earth friendly’ materials.

        Like

  7. Quote: “Students — both minority and not — don’t know that the sciences require more study time on average and give out lower grades,” says Arcidiacono.

    Is this professor really that stupid? Anyone going into the hard sciences, engineering, medicine, and nursing, knows they’re hard majors. As an engineering graduate who saw quite a few of my classmates shift their major to business, I saw what happened.

    Those who bailed out knew that STEM subjects took more studying than Whining Studies programs. What they didn’t realize were their personal inadequacies, either to learn the math and science or to devote the time required. They knew engineering was hard. They just did not understand how hard.

    The real problem lies in the fact that fewer and fewer high school students are going to college after being challenged enough in high school to understand their limitations. These interviews of Canadian university students illustrates just how little they know about history.

    Notice too how easy it is to get those students to believe that a Nazi general who fought to keep North Africa Nazi would make a good peace envoy to Africa. Just leave out the “Nazi” part and chat up his being German as multicultural.

    –Michael W. Perry, editor of Chesterton on War and Peace: Battling the Ideas and Movements that Led to Nazism and World War II

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What he’s saying is that schools are doing a poor job of preparing especially minority kids to understand what the field requires. And he is correct. You just said it yourself. Quite a few of your classmates switched. And quite a few of those kids do too, because they’re simply unprepared.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Quote: “Students — both minority and not — don’t know that the sciences require more study time on average and give out lower grades,” says Arcidiacono.

      Is this professor really that stupid? Anyone going into the hard sciences, engineering, medicine, and nursing, knows they’re hard majors. As an engineering graduate who saw quite a few of my classmates shift their major to business, I saw what happened.

      Those who bailed out knew that STEM subjects took more studying than Whining Studies programs. What they didn’t realize were their personal inadequacies, either to learn the math and science or to devote the time required. They knew engineering was hard. They just did not understand how hard.

      Wow…sounds like your experiences actually VALIDATE the professor you’re calling stupid. Your peers were clearly not prepared.

      Those “personal inadequacies” you mention? All those really meant was that the individual would need to put it a lot more study time in order to pass. You can be smug and superior if you want to, but that is what this professor was talking about. They didn’t realize what they were getting into.

      The real problem lies in the fact that fewer and fewer high school students are going to college after being challenged enough in high school to understand their limitations. These interviews of Canadian university students illustrates just how little they know about history.

      Notice too how easy it is to get those students to believe that a Nazi general who fought to keep North Africa Nazi would make a good peace envoy to Africa. Just leave out the “Nazi” part and chat up his being German as multicultural.

      WTF are you smoking? No, seriously, what is it?

      It’s a “gotcha” video designed to show that if you frame anything the right way with people who aren’t familiar with that segment of history–and there are ALWAYS people who are unfamiliar with any segment of history–you’ll get some answers that you can slap into a video.

      A five minute plus long video that clearly took longer than that to film. How many didn’t fall for the trap? How many students did they ask who said, “Did you say, ‘The Desert Fox?’ That’s Rommel. Oh hell no!” when they were approached?

      Honestly, I make a living bashing the stupid in the typical Western college student, and even I think this is more than a little disingenuous.

      –Michael W. Perry, editor of Chesterton on War and Peace: Battling the Ideas and Movements that Led to Nazism and World War II

      And seriously, WTF is the point of this? Are you just trying to come across as a bloviating jackass? If so, well played, sir. You have succeeded.

      Pro tip: If you want to pimp your book in a comment, that is NOT how you do it. At all.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Seriously. Anyone who puts the fact that he edited a book into a “sig block” on a blog post has to be a special kind of pedantic jackass!

        More likely than not, this will ensure no one will ever buy it.

        Like

        1. Well, it has a whopping two reviews on Amazon…in nine years.

          If anyone did buy it, it clearly made an impression. /sarc

          FWIW, if the book were relevant to the discussion, I could see it. But it’s not except on his little tangent with the video.

          Liked by 1 person

        2. Oh, I agree. It’s either a blatant attempt to whore out his work, or a vapid attempt to establish “credibility” to bolster his spurious nonsense.

          Like

        3. And fails on both counts.

          But it does give us a slight window into his personality.

          Kind of like his comment at According to Hoyt’s did.

          Liked by 1 person

        4. Yep. Sounds like someone in dire need of attention and validation.

          Like

        5. And we’re meanie butts for not giving it to him.

          Liked by 1 person

      2. One more thing: Erwin Rommel was not only not a member of the Nazi party, but was peripherally involved in the Valkyrie Plot against Hitler (y”sh). (On July 20, 1944, he was in hospital recovering from wounds from an Allied strafing of his command car.) To save the regime the propaganda debacle of arrest, trial, and execution of the Desert Fox, he was offered the choice of a cyanide capsule, with the promise his family would be spared. He took it, and was given a state funeral after ostensibly having died of aftereffects of his wounds.

        Like

  8. My guess is they’ll just find something else to get all butthurt about.

    Ding ding ding! Winner!
    How useless it must be to wake up in the morning and begin the search all over *again* for shit that offends. If you can’t find it – make it up.
    What a waste of time and energy…at OUR expense.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. THIS TRIGGERS ME.

    (had to say it. couldn’t resist. sorry)

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Nunya F. Biznatch | Reply

    If you make References to acronyms, please be aware that there is a standard practice of using the full definition of said acronym (usually the first time) within the text. Not that I can’t figure out what STEM is. But I just might have another acronym myself. They equipment I’m learning right now comes with 7 pages of acronyms as a supplement. But I love your outspoken no bs style as usual. And you seldom fail to present some interesting way of calling someone a crybaby or a moron in some colorful and creative fashion I had never considered.

    Like

  11. […] You see, promoting STEM education among minorities is insufficient, so this creature was awarded taxpayer money to find fault with white people for low minority participation in STEM fields.  MORE […]

    Like

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