These Boots Were Made for Walkin’

I had what I hope is my last physical therapy appointment for my ankle today. That is not to say the ankle is perfect. It’s still sore on occasion, and sometimes it swells so much, it kind of looks deformed. But I have exercises I will do at home, I ice regularly, and the ankle is stable, which is the biggest and best effect of the Brostrom procedure I had nearly four months ago.

That’s the good.

The bad is the fact that I can’t wear the majority of my shoes. Even a small, two-inch heel leaves me in pain. I wore a pair of black boots I absolutely adore to work last week, and I literally hobbled back home! Yikes!

Luckily for me, department stores to the rescue!

Department stores have found an alternative to the low-price TVs sold by electronic chains to draw crowds over the Thanksgiving weekend: a $19.99 pair of women’s boots.

Belk Inc. started offering the heavily discounted boots as its “door-buster” seven years ago. The promotion was so successful that it has been repeated every year since, and adopted by rivals like Kohl’s Corp., Macy’s Inc. and J.C. Penney Co.

“$19.99 is a magic number,” said Joseph Safdeye, chief executive of E.S. Originals Inc., a shoe importer that came up with the idea. “When a lady can walk in with $100 and buy five pairs of boots, that’s a good deal.”

Guess what resides just across the street from my apartment building!

Photo courtesy of the Wall Street Journal

Photo courtesy of the Wall Street Journal

Hi, Macy’s! I can haz boots?

I hate tossing some of the absolutely gorgeous shoes I have! I wear them to work. They look incredible with a black suit – or a dress, for that matter. The thought is unappealing enough that I’m willing to wait a little to see if the ankle heals up enough for me to wear my favorite shoes and boots again.

But…

In the meantime, I need BOOTS!!! It’s fall, dontcha know! BOOTS!

I’ve learned over the years that buying cheap crap made in China isn’t worth the few bucks you save. The boots generally fall apart after a few months of wear, or they make your feet sweat to such a degree, you feel like you’re walking through a swamp, toes squishing in sludge. So, the doorbuster deal doesn’t generally appeal to me as a consumer. I want quality.

That said, this year – until the ankle heals, which my physical therapist says could take six months to a year – I may be enticed to grab a pair of these things to tide me over until I can wear my boots again without crying.

Black Friday, here I come!

23 responses

  1. I’m surprised that no ortho/podiatry doc has invented a better procedure by now.
    I had same thing done to my right ankle after I tore a few ligaments back in ’97? ’98? somewhere in there.
    Took close to a year to get back to normal.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ugh. Hoping it won’t be THAT long! I hate this right now.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. If you wear compression type socks- the ones like docs prescribe for people with varicose veins it helps a lot. If you have a Walgreens nearby they carry them. I think their called “support stockings”.
        Prevents the ankle from swelling as much.

        Like

        1. I’ll have to check those out. I wear suits, so I’m not sure how hideous that would look. I guess we’ll see.

          Like

  2. I am just writing to wish you a Happy Thanksgiving. I also wanted to tell you about a woman that I went to school with. Mind you, this is a small, I mean less than 400 students in the high school, school in MI. She has 4 sons an a daughter. I just found out that one of her sons is a senior writer/editor for Atlantic Media and works in the Watergate building. Another of her sons just got out of the army, and is going to work for the Defense Intelligence Agency in D.C., and they are going to share an apt. I immediately thought of you, as I know that this is kind of in your area, well, sort of. The real story is that two young men from such a small backwater town as mine could do so much for themselves. Her son number one, the journalist, was the moderator at a high level panel this week, called I think the Defense One Summit, or something like that. Oh, I also heard from my own son, he is in the U.S. Navy. He just was promoted to 2nd class petty officer. I know it all is pretty inconsequential to you, but I am proud of all three of these young men. And I wanted to wish you speedy recovery as well.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Tell me more. I’m from a little town in Mi that had a small high school. Byron Area Agricultural Schools. When I graduated, there was 70 people in my class. The town had 650 people in it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow. My graduating class had around 650 people. Yeesh!

        Like

      2. If Byron area is Byron Center, then I know it well. I come from the small town of Hesperia. No, not CA, but MI. I graduated in 78 and we had 78 students in my senior class. Believe it or not, out of that small class, I think that around 8 or so of us went on to earn all or part of our living playing music. Most of us were just part timers, but for such a small town, the arts were important back then. Now, the money for such things is not a given. I say that after I learned how to read, the only other thing I really needed school for was to learn to play music. We also had a young man who joined the Air Force to be a pilot, who found out that it was not the right way to go about it. He did his hitch, went to college, and after graduation, joined the Navy, where he became a helicopter pilot. His father was a captain in the Navy, on a very large ship, the type I don’t remember. This young man was flying off the California coast at night as a recovery support chopper, while jet pilots got night flight training. His helicopter went down in the ocean, and they only found his flight helmet. The entire crew was lost at sea. A huge blow to a small town, such as the one we came from. His father, by this time USN. retired, did the swearing in of my niece into the U.S. Air Force as a Lt., she had gone to college and became an RN and then joined the military. She was stationed in VA for a long time,taking care of officers wives, and their babies. She was instrumental in starting some type of program for those who had miscarriages or stillbirths. Small towns are full of the kind of people that really do make up the fabric of America.

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    2. It’s absolutely NOT inconsequential! I revel in such warm success stories like a pig in mud! Thank you to you and yours, and I hope you have a wonderful day!

      Like

    3. A bit over 500 in my graduating class in Colorado Springs…but I’ve known people who had a dozen or so in theirs. Pretty much anything east of here for three hundred miles is going to be VERY small school districts, graduating class size of two dozen at most. The exurb I’m living in now probably has a total student body of less than a thousand, though I expect that will change over the next twenty years.

      Like

  3. All together now…”These boots were made for walkin’…” 🙂

    Happy Thanksgiving, Dear Lady. And here’s hoping you’ll be back in your favorite shoes soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ear worm!🙂 happy Thanksgiving! Enjoy the day with loved ones!

      Like

  4. Helped my wife (nicknamed “Imelda”) donate all of her heeled footwear to Goodwill. After a hemorrhagic stroke a few years back, she lacks the balance and mobility to wear heels. So, now it’s flats only, but at least she’s still walking.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Lois E Brenneman, MSN, FNP | Reply

    Get yourself a pair of knee high compression stockings – good ones with lots of compression. They will go a long way to helping with your swelling. Right now, fluid is pooling down in your lower extremities esp your ankles. The compression stockings will help push that fluid upwards and then back into circulation. When fluid pools anywhere, it means it is out of circulation, accumulating locally. You want to get that fluid back into circulation so you can pee out the excess fluid and get rid of it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m lucky I got a standing desk at work. That has been a huge help too! I’ll look into those.

      Like

  6. The one thing I’ve learned in 45 years of walking on concrete is, get a good pair of shoes. Bad shoes will hurt your feet and you will make adjustments in walking to make your feet quit hurting. These adjustments throw your back out of alignment. Now you’ve got two problems that hurt.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know that we used to pay a lot of money for dress shoes that we seldom wore, and then bought cheap work boots that we would spend 12 hours plus a day in. Took me a couple years to get the right mix in place. My feet are the one thing that don’t bother me after 35 + years of foundry work and several as a maintenance man.

      Like

  7. On a not-all-that-related note, I remember when “your mother wears combat boots” was a deadly insult.

    Anyone who tried that on your kids in school probably got a look like “I don’t get it. Am I supposed to feel insulted?”

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    1. Heh. ‘Tis true. Although I wonder how many kids would even know that insult.

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      1. These days, I suppose it’s more likely kids today would say something like “My drill sergeant mother can stuff your dad in a wastebasket.” Or alternatively, they’d look for their safe space. (I don’t believe yours fell into the second category!)

        Toughness is as much mindset as it is actual physical strength, and not one that’s encouraged all across our society.

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        1. *gigglesnort* at my kids needing safe spaces. LMAO

          Liked by 1 person

        2. Personally, I’ve grown to regard gun shops and ranges as my safe spaces.

          I tell people there that and they get a good laugh out of it.

          Liked by 1 person

  8. If you are willing to risk life and limb for a cheap pair of boots, you are much braver than I am. And I was a Marine. I’ll say a little prayer for you speedy recovery. Be careful out there.

    Like

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