Quit virtue signalling over the damn gorilla incident!

My news feed today was filled with news of Harambe – the 17-year-old male Western lowland Silverback gorilla who was fatally shot in an effort to save a little boy who had fallen into the animal’s enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo.

Some are screeching that the parents of the 3-year-old child should be held responsible for Harambe’s death. There’s even a Change.org petition that has garnered more than 100,000 signatures demanding the parents be charged with the animal’s death. Mourners held a vigil for the ape, #JusticeForHarambe was trending on social media, and in a stroke of sheer jackassery, some obtuse ignorami went as far as to claim the gorilla was shot because of white privilege.

Get a load at this retard.

BTW, the kid wasn’t white, according to press, so this Hood “Intellect” is also a bigot.

The gorilla was seen dragging the kid through the water by his leg. He looked agitated, and the crowds probably didn’t help the situation. Tranquilizing the animal would have probably taken a bit, especially with the adrenaline that was likely coursing through his body. In those precious seconds that child would likely have been killed.

Yes, it’s a tragedy. Yes, it sucks that the gorilla was killed, but as the zoo officials said, they had a tough decision to make and they made it.

At first, it looked like Harambe was trying to help the boy, O’Connor said. The gorilla stood him up and pulled up his pants. However, as the crowd’s clamors grew, Harambe tossed the boy into a corner of the moat and stood over him, O’Connor said. As the crowd’s cries grew, the video shows Harambe grabbing the boy by the foot, dragged him through the water and out of the moat atop the habitat, O’Connor said.

Yeah, sorry, but it’s no contest. A child’s life is worth more than a gorilla’s. This is a human life, we’re talking about, people!

apeThen you have the judgmental fuckwads who are virtue signalling all over the Internet about the lack of parental responsibility, and how the parents should be held accountable.

You’d charge a parent for leaving a child in a car alone. Why not hold them responsible for allowing a toddler into a gorilla enclosure.

I have to wonder if a) any of these dumbshitsauri have ever been to a zoo on a busy weekend and b) if they’ve ever had a toddler for any length of time.

These little buggers are slippery and quick. You look away for one second, and they can disappear quickly into a crowd. This is in no way the same as locking your kid in a hot car!

This was a tragic accident, but if you’re a parent, you know these incidents can happen only too easily. Sometimes it’s not due to human stupidity, but simple tragic circumstances outside anyone’s control. Anyone who has kids can tell you that.

So quit with the virtue signalling already. I know it gives your petty little ego a boost to vent your rage on the Internet to show what a concerned world citizen you are, but all you’re doing is showing yourself to be a world class douche.

A human life was saved. Be grateful, and quit shitposting your judgments.

65 responses

  1. I’m sorry, but I have to agree on the first part and disagree on the second part.

    First, the zoo did what they had to do. The damage had already been done, the kid was in danger. So sadly, the zoo had no other choice but to put the gorilla down.

    But as far as the parent’s neglect? I’m sorry, but I don’t care how squirrely kids are or how crowded the zoo was. As a PARENT, you have a responsibility to watch your children at ALL times, and if it looks like the kid is trying to defeat the numerous barriers put in place to prevent someone from going into the compound, THEN HOLD ONTO THE CHILD.

    From some of the reports that I read, this kid had been actively talking about wanting to go into the compound, and his parents just watched him go past three of the four barriers before he fell into the water.

    To me, this is NEGLECT.

    Zoos might be a ‘family place’, but they ARE dangerous places as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I gotta disagree with you there. A toddler jokes about getting into an animal enclosure, I wouldn’t take him seriously either. It takes seconds for a kid to slip away. Then, parents are frantically looking for him through crowds while he’s climbing where he’s not supposed to. Add to that the panic and disorientation, and it’s a recipe for disaster. I don’t see neglect. I see tragic accident. My mind may change as more facts come out, but based on what I’ve read so far, I can’t accuse the parents of outright neglect.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The way I see it, if the child can’t be controlled, then maybe the zoo isn’t the place to take him.

        And why didn’t the parents have a hold of the kid?

        How many times have you gone into a store and had to deal with a bunch of young children running around, while the mother is talking on the phone and just not paying any bit of attention to her kids poking meat in the coolers or just being a nuisance?

        I still have VIVID memories of MY mother damn near keeping us a military attention next to the shopping cart while she shopped. IF we got out of line at all, we would have gotten a swat. Or two.

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        1. Oh, I think there’s some space between mom not paying attention, yammering on the phone, etc. and mom perhaps having her attention diverted by something for a minute. I don’t know why they didn’t have a hold of the kid. Maybe they did and just let go for a few seconds. Maybe they were letting him run around like crazy. I’ve been to the zoo on any given Sunday – not even a holiday weekend – and it’s crazy. I can see a kid slipping away in the melee.

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    2. Paul (Drak Bibliophile) Howard

      I’ve heard that the child wanted to go into the compound and his mother said no.

      However, I want cites for the parents “watching him” going past the barriers.

      Note, I want regular news cites, not one of these “activists” claiming that the parents “just watched the boy go past the barriers”.

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  2. Paul (Drak Bibliophile) Howard

    Agree.

    Of course, I’ve too often felt that the animal-rights folks care more about animals than people and won’t see anything wrong if a hungry wild animal ate a child.

    Sometimes, I doubt that they’d care if it was their child that was eaten.😦

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Unfortunately, I have to agree with you.

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    2. you got it right, the gorilla’s life is worth quite a bit more than a low iQ dumb a.. that jumps in, besides it did not hurt the kid, did it

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      1. the boy was taken to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital with serious, but non-life-threatening injuries.

        What is your definition of “not hurt” it only include dead or disabled for life?

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  3. I watched the video of Harambe with the boy. I know enough about the male gorilla to know that he was trying to protect the boy (a juvenile gorilla in his eyes) from attack. If the zoo had told everyone to shut and leave RIGHT THEN, they might not have had to shoot him. But the crowd did nothing except agitate an adult male gorilla who was acting entirely on instinct, trying to protect what he viewed as a juvenile hairless ape.

    I blame the crowd for all of it, not the zoo and not the parents, really, because I know how quick kids are and how many idiotic things they can do. Harambe simply reacted on his instincts, nothing else. He was watching the crowd the entire time. In his gorilla mind, the juvenile hairless ape was being threatened in some way that he didn’t understand.

    And for the idiot who had to throw the race card in there, GORILLAS DON’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT SKIN COLOR, YOU ASSWIPE. THEY ONLY KNOW ABOUT ADULT AND JUVENILE APES. They treat their youngsters better than a lot of humans do.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I studied gorillas in college. The behavior the gorilla was exhibiting was the same seen in footage of gorillas killing young gorillas in the wild. Primates are not nice predictable animals that will save a human child. The way the gorilla was dragging the child about it was leading up to the gorilla killing the child IMO. Moving the crowd wouldn’t have changed this. The zoo did what they had to do.

      I’m trying to find what kind of enclosure the gorilla was in down at Gladys Porter before it was moved to Ohio – I have a feeling that like most male gorillas, he was segregated from the breeding age females. Because his daddy was still at Gladys Porter until about 3 years ago, siring young. Male gorillas are seen as undesirable by most zoos with breeding programs, so they often end up alone.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Edited to say: I’m a racist prick.

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    1. Paul (Drak Bibliophile) Howard

      WTF??????

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      1. He was saying WTF to your initial post, trash.

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        1. Paul (Drak Bibliophile) Howard

          Correct.

          I got that “idiot’s” post via email before Nicki edited it.

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    2. EXCUSE ME???? you want to post racist shit, you don’t do it here, asshole!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Who is virtue signalling now, asshole? And either delete my post or leave it alone. Don’t alter it.

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        1. It’s my fucking site, you racist cockbag. Don’t EVER come here spewing that shit! Otherwise that’s what you get. Read the fucking posting rules, asshole. Follow them, or go away.

          Liked by 3 people

        2. “And either delete my post or leave it alone. Don’t alter it.”

          Some nerve, you ratfucking pissguzzler, telling her what she may or may not do with the pile of dogshit you left on her porch.

          Liked by 3 people

        3. He won’t be coming back.🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        4. I hope not. Sometimes people like that decide to create a new account somewhere just so they can continue to be rights-violating turds.

          It appears you appreciated my pile-on, Nicki. I’m glad. I realize it’s your prerogative to stomp peoples’ guts out here (though I do recommend dungarees for the task, given what those people are full of–it could squirt out) and after thinking about it I thought “She might not want help. She certainly doesn’t need help, guts are scattered all over the place here.” But apparently community-supplied overkill is not frowned upon here.

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        5. Oh, I always appreciate a good stomping – no matter where it comes from! My ego is not so fragile that I can’t allow quality pounding of a shit brick from others than myself!🙂

          So please, my all means be my surrogate stomper, or my complementary stomper… either way, if the turd returns, he’s in for a rude awakening.

          Liked by 1 person

        6. Meanwhile, I just realized that’s the THIRD time I channelled R. Lee Ermey in the last 24 hours.

          I guess I need to watch that movie again.

          Liked by 1 person

        7. If you’re going to channel anyone, make it R. Lee, because AWESOME!

          Liked by 1 person

        8. “He won’t be coming back.”

          Damnit, we needed a new chew-toy!

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  5. I have a grandson who is three years old. And from that perspective: Sorry the gorilla had to die, but if the child was endangered, the gorilla has to die.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. When people talk about “get a tranquilizer” I want to reach through the screen and smack them. It’s not like the movies. You don’t shoot the animal with the tranquilizer and it falls over unconscious. You shoot it, and over a bit of time it gradually gets groggy and then lays down and goes to sleep.

    You use those tranquilizers from a safe distance because between the time you use it and the time the animal goes to sleep they can cause a variety of damage.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Yes, was with a wild fire crew that shot a mountain lion with a trank. We huddled in our vehicles for many minutes until she fell ovet.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Re-runs of Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom need to come back. I remember a couple of episodes where they showed them tranq’ing an animal, usually from the air, and the thing just kept running and running.

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    3. If the critter is already agitated, a tranq may not work at all.

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    4. Granny Grunch

      I haven’t seen this rersponse,yet, but i bet it is out there somewhere. If They had to shoot him…..why didn’t They shoot him in the legs? Also…note that Big Momma said NO when the little darling wanted to get in there. It is apparent that Mommas NO doesn’t mean much.

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      1. My guess is that it would make the animal even more agitated and probably enraged as well.

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        1. Paul (Drak Bibliophile) Howard

          Leg shots are easy (and work) only in the movies.😦

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      2. “It is apparent that Mommas NO doesn’t mean much.”

        Yeah, no kid in the history of the WORLD ever disobeyed Mom.

        Ever.

        I have never been a parent, and I know how fast the little weasels can get into things they shouldn’t, and have been told not to…..

        You’d think some adults were walking around intentionally retarded, the way some are screaming about parental neglect, etc…..

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  7. My kid was a ducking ninja at that age. One time I went in to pee and when I came out the little fucker was seven feet off the ground climbing a wrought iron support that the Wallendas would attempt.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. he was just tryin to live up to his nick name there daddy an make you proud of him. also trying to give you heart failure…

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Ghost Rider 6

    Anyone who would value the life of a child over the life of any animal is a psycho. And once the child fell into the moat (for whatever reason) and was grabbed by the gorilla, there was no other option.

    In fact, let’s see what Jack Hanna, director emeritus of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium had to say about what would have happened if the animal had not been shot to death: “I’ll bet my life on this, that child would not be here today.” Hanna also said killing the gorilla was the only way to protect the child. He says that it would take up to 10 minutes for a tranquilizer to set in and that the gorilla would be agitated after getting shot.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. “Anyone who would value the life of a child over the life of any animal is a psycho.”

      I’m going to guess you meant that the other way around, given the rest of what you wrote.

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      1. Ghost Rider 6

        I did. Don’t know how that happened.

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  9. I have children. If my son did that it would have been my fault. I would have also supported killing the gorilla.

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    1. Don’t get me wrong. I don’t mean to imply that somehow the parents are absolved of the responsibility. But I hesitate to call it neglect.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Last I checked over the Memorial weekend in Chicago 40 people were gunned down 4 died and my FB News Feed is full of outrage over a dead gorilla?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Apparently Black Lives only Matter when it’s not another Black shooting at them.

      No, *I’m* not the racist here. The people deciding what was “news” and what wasn’t, are the racists. To say nothing of the BLM organization.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Granny Grunch

      And how many were killed/injured by other means? No gun=a non happening.

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  11. With a toddler, they really don’t know any better. When they’re eight or so, then yeah, there is a reasonable expectation of ‘knowing better.’ 4 years old? They don’t know any better at all. I agree that there’s no concrete evidence of neglect, and yeah, I’d actually blame the crowd for agitating the gorilla.

    The Daily Mail article cites other people defending the mother and a woman who tried to grab the boy before he fell in.

    I remember taking my children to a zoo in Manila, where they had tigers as part of their exhibit. My then toddler boy was running back and forth between my mom and his sister, who was looking at the tiger cubs. A young male tiger, who’d been separated from the other tigers, and he stalked my son, even though there were several layers of cage between him and my kid. There weren’t many people that day and I could see him clearly as he ran back and forth – my mom was walking slowly and he wanted her to hurry – and both she and I were chilled by the sight of the tiger stalking my boy, even lunging and jumping at the cage, in the hopes of being able to grab me boyo and drag him in if he could’ve.

    The urge to kill that tiger to protect my kid was very, very strong even though I knew he wasn’t able to get my son.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for this. Certainly sounds like it was a tragic accident, but not negligence.

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  12. If only people got this incensed over stupid shit the government does. Then perhaps we would not be stuck with two horrible options running for President.

    It was not the parents’ fault. It was the zoo’s fault for not having proper fencing around the enclosure.

    I’m a farmer. It’s my fault when my animals get out of my fencing. If a toddler could get in, how do they keep a gorilla from getting out? Luck, I suppose.

    People are damned quick to hate other people these days.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “If a toddler could get in, how do they keep a gorilla from getting out? Luck, I suppose.”

      It’s easy to fall INTO a moat. It’s harder to climb out.

      Do your research.

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      1. It should not be too difficult for a gorilla to freaking climb. Use your brain.

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  13. Really unfortunate incident. They had a tough decision, and they made it. Maybe the gorilla would have hurt the kid, and maybe it wouldn’t have (wasn’t a “maybe” they were willing to gamble on, though). It’s too bad it didn’t turn out similarly to this:

    Perhaps the zoo can put an additional type of fence/protection in place, it seems like I’ve heard of kids ending up in gorilla pits more than once. When we went to a zoo several years ago, a toddler wandered up to us out of nowhere and we stayed with her until her frantic mother found her. It’s very easy for kids that age to wander off.

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    1. According to Jack Hanna is an expert, and he’s convinced the gorilla would have harmed the boy.

      “I’ve seen him take a green coconut, which you can’t bust open with a sledgehammer and squish it like this,” Hanna told “Good Morning America” about Harambe, gesturing with his hand the ease with which gorillas can crush fruit. “You’re dealing with either human life or animal life here. So what is the decision? I think it’s very simple to figure that out.”

      “I can tell you now, that there’s no doubt in my mind the child would not be here today if they hadn’t made the decision,” Hanna said.
      Hanna also defended his position on CBS This Morning and was even more adamant that a horrific tragedy was avoided.

      “You hear the screaming noise and watch that gorilla’s response. He doesn’t know what’s going on — he’s a silverback and not a female. You can see by his face that he’s alarmed. He goes over and looks at the little child, there’s no doubt about that, but what happens when you tranquilize the animal?”

      “I do research in the wild with gorillas and I know what happens,” Hanna expounded. “When the dart hits that animal … he jumps and what would happen if the animal had a hold of that little boy?”

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      1. “You’re dealing with either human life or animal life here. So what is the decision? I think it’s very simple to figure that out.” [From the Jack Hanna quote]

        Yes, it’s very easy to figure out, and some nihilistic turds (whose initials are P E T A or A L F) have a very easy time figuring out the wrong answer.

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        1. I was always a big fan of these things for kids that age, although not every parent has/uses one:

          It’s come in handy at zoos, airports, and theme parks, among other (high traffic) places.

          Liked by 1 person

        2. I remember sometimes seeing mothers who had coiled cables (not unlike the handset-to-phone connection on wired phones) attaching them to their toddlers. About a six foot range, and I sometimes saw two toddlers connected to the same mother. Watching them wander off, hit the limits of the wire, and bounce back was a bit like watching animations of electrons orbiting a nucleus.

          Liked by 3 people

  14. Unfortunately, I think you are missing the big picture. There is no denying that this is tragic. However, it was avoidable. Please do not make excuses for poor parental skills. We have become a society that enables those that are irresponsible, defends those that make poor judgment and feel that we should live in a no blame zone. Because God forbid we actually make somebody responsible for their actions or lack there of. This mom was notified by her child of his impending action, she failed to respond and act in appropriate manner while taking pics (possibly selfies) at the zoo. This is negligence. Getting struck by lightning while trying to get out of a storm is an accident. Allowing your child to breach an enclosure that had never been breached in its 38 year history is NEGLIGENCE. This is the problem with our society… defending the ignorant, the lazy, and the worthless. Oh yeah before you attack with the whole BS parent card… I am a parent of a 2 year old and a 3 month old and have been actively helping raise my niece and nephew who are 8 and 10 .

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    1. I don’t know if you’re new or what, but I’m not in the habit of defending the lazy and negligent. That said, I’m also not in the habit of passing judgment until I get some facts. The eyewitness account does not support that assessment.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. “I am a parent of a 2 year old and a 3 month old…

      If you haven’t made a mistake and lost track of one yet…. relax, some day you will.

      Get used to the idea, and plan for it.

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  15. Just to be sarcastic and curmudgeonly, here’s my take on it:

    There are over 7 BILLION people on the globe. There are maybe 100,000 Lowland Gorillas.

    They should have saved the gorilla, and let evolution take its course with the kid, thereby helping save one species and improve the other.

    And this is why I should never be a parent.

    ;>)

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    1. Yep you do need to be removed from the gene pool too bad there are quite a few others like you http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/9113394/Killing-babies-no-different-from-abortion-experts-say.HTML

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      1. And, as CLEARLY STATED, I was being sarcastic. Pull the stick out.

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  16. Yep I agree you need to be removed from the gene pool too bad there are so many like you http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/9113394/Killing-babies-no-different-from-abortion-experts-say.HTML

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    1. In your comment who is “you”?

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    2. I’m guessing you are replying to me.

      And, as CLEARLY STATED, I was being sarcastic. Pull the stick out.

      Like

  17. […] it bleeds, it leads.” Outrage gives people purpose, notoriety, and attention. It’s virtue signalling that provides the veneer of caring for the victim, or helps paint the outraged themselves into a […]

    Like

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