I’m a liberal because I think Starbucks has private property rights

More on the Starbucks controversy. The money shot:
“I received several emails from people proud to show me photos of their “demonstration.” Invariably, it was an image of some guy flashing his holstered firearm in the middle of the store, while a lady in the background looks on with an expression of concern and befuddlement. My response was always the same: the store let you carry that inside, why are you punishing them for it? Yes, perhaps other patrons shouldn’t be worried just because half of the people in the store are armed to the teeth, but they will be worried. And you know it. So your act of “appreciation” is to hurt the business you claim to appreciate by abusing the thing you appreciate them for? I’m confused. And befuddled. Actually, I guess I can relate to that woman in the photo.

This is like if I permit you to wear shoes in my house, so you, rejoicing my leniency, celebrate by jumping into a mud puddle, stomping on my carpet and putting your feet up on my coffee table. Congratulations, I’ve just amended my shoe policy, and it’s all your fault.

I love gun rights, I’m a humongous Second Amendment advocate, and I have consistently and passionately used whatever little voice I have to advocate for the rights of gun owners, but this — this is not activism. This is a disservice to the gun rights movement. Responsible gun owners don’t parade around coffee shops with their shotguns just so they can post a photo of it on social media. Responsible gun owners aren’t impressed with themselves; they see the gun as a tool — not a toy, not a fashion accessory, not a “point,” not an excuse to cause a scene — and they carry that tool with a sense of maturity and discipline.”

The Matt Walsh Blog

I remember when a fast food chicken sandwich restaurant became, out of nowhere, a hotly contested battle ground in the gay marriage debate. Everything was fine, everything was normal, everybody was eating chicken, until suddenly liberal activist organizations were encouraging gay men have heated make out sessions at their local Chick-fil-A, and Christians were countering with a Bible in one hand and waffle fries in the other. Boycotts, rallies, Appreciation Days, demonstrations, fundraisers — it was war. Personally, I have plenty of opinions on the topic of gay marriage, but on the topic of Chick-fil-A all I ever cared about was their chicken.

Millions of people cried out, “We must win Chick-fil-A to our side!”

And I courageously stood and shouted, “Can I get a number one with a Diet Coke?”

I didn’t think political discourse could get any more absurd than the Gays vs. Chicken War of 2012, but…

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13 responses

  1. Businesses are private enterprises; they have the right to decide what they can or cannot allow in their stores. Similarly, I have the right to take my money elsewhere.

    It really is that fucking simple.

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  2. I have read your words and I am inclined to agree with you. Too many oc people became overly enthusiastic about carrying in SB and this activity sent out the wrong message. Personally I don’t believe in oc unless I’m out in the sticks. I also believe that if I’m not welcome somewhere I’m not going there.

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  3. Ceefour, I’m the same way. If I don’t believe I’m welcome somewhere, then I won’t go there. That’s why I’ve not willingly been in a Christian church for more almost thirty years.

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  4. When Wisconsin finally passed CC, the place I worked at immediately put signs up stating that firearms were prohibited on the premises. I support their right to that because they are a private business. However, I also thought that it was a shallow gesture. I can understand that they may want to prevent accidental discharges that may cause injuries and lead to lawsuits. But this does not prevent someone who is predisposed to “shooting up the place” from doing so. What is this person going to do? Leave his weapon in his car when he sees the sign? And if a few people are injured or killed on the job by a nutcase, what about the lawsuits filed by victims or their families because the business failed to protect their employees?

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  5. Well said, Nikki. It bothers me that in any argument, people have lost sight of a concept called restraint. Just because you CAN doesn’t mean you SHOULD. Just because it’s LEGAL does not make it RIGHT. A few manners never hurt anyone.

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  6. OT, Vic, I’m curious why you think you’re not welcome in any Christian church. If you had a bad experience in one — which I assume is the case — why not find another?

    I know for a fact you’d be welcome in mine.

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    1. @michaelacummings: The reasons are multitude. If you truly want to know, email me. I have no desire to discuss them in public forum.

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      1. Send me an email — michaelacummings at hotmail dotcom. I hold to Dennis Prager’s rule of preferring clarity over agreement, so have at it.

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  7. Starbucks does have private property rights, and so do I to not give them my money.

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  8. FWIW, in addition to rights and responsibilities I think we need to consider outcomes here. Many of us in the gun rights community tend to reflexively see people as (in the immortal words of W) being either “for us or against us”. That’s not entirely true. There are many people out there who really don’t think about us much at all. Maybe they have a vague understanding that keeping and bearing arms is a right, but maybe they just don’t like guns. Maybe they’re even a little bit afraid of them based on what they see in the media. Again, I’m not talking about people who march with the Brady Campaign. I’m talking about people who could be either brought to our side or even just left neutral. Now take one of those people, stick them in a Starbucks with a café-latte-venti-crappi-whatever, and then have someone walk in who’s kitted up like Solid Fucking Snake (pictures of people engaged in this kind of overkill are widely available on FB, youtube, etc). All talk of the rights we value aside, do you think that person will leave with a better or worse impression of gun owners based on that experience? Sure, I have the legal right (in certain jurisdictions) to tote my FN-FAL on my coffee run; just like I have the legal right to punch myself in the balls. I’m not going to do either because of the logical outcomes.

    P.S. sorry this runs so long. For whatever reason I had a hard time getting all this out without sounding (in my own ears at least) “concern trollish”. That wasn’t where I wanted to go with this.

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    1. Not at all. I 100 percent agree with you! Perfect post!

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  9. You are so correct, once again. And, you do it so articulately. Unfortunately, every group has its’ assholes. This includes gun owners.

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