‘Comprehensive’ immigration ‘reform’, reality, and rhetoric

Right now, the President is trying, along with Dianne Feinstein and the other usual suspects, to push legislation that would further abrogate our Second Amendment rights. Most Republicans in Congress are finding their courage, despite the bizarre sideshow that is Piers Morgan, and standing up to this to one degree or another.

But we’re not here to talk about that, at least not this evening. No, the focus is on the subject of the other great push about to be made by (most) Democrats and (some) Republicans, ‘comprehensive immigration reform’, aka AMNESTY. Yes, kids, that’s what it’s called when you reward people for illegal behavior. And make no mistake, when you let people who have entered the United States illegally stay, pay their kids’ college tuition, and make it possible for them to gain citizenship, you are REWARDING that behavior. The President will team up with Democrats and RINOs in Congress like John McCain and Lindsey Graham, who tried this in 2006-07 and were shocked when the people rose up and made it clear they weren’t having any of this. Now, the usual suspects say, the political environment is different. Republicans supposedly need to bow down, give up their principles, and pursue the Hispanic vote by offering them special privileges, free stuff, and amnesty, as the “Cafe Con Leche Republicans” insist.

Like hell. As I stated after the election, the LAST thing we need to be doing is rolling over. This will allow the left to import more third-world collectivists who will vote for the nanny state and handouts and strain our health care system and infrastructure even more. These people also may not share our culture. Libertarians might be apoplectic at this idea, and that’s fine. What they’re missing, as Ilana Mercer put it, is the civilizational aspect to libertarianism. In their rush to see who score the highest on libertarian purity tests, they’re missing the place where purist neolibertarian philosophy crumbles when it comes into contact with reality. Immigration is one such area. Aaron Alghawi, a national board member of the Republican Liberty Caucus, has come up with what I consider a reasonable starting point for a pro-liberty immigration platform. It’s lacking in two areas. Firstly, we need to secure the border in a serious and sustained fashion. A wall/fence with vehicle barriers and geophones from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico. No excuses. Second, everyone here illegally should have to go ‘home’ and get in line behind everyone else and apply for re-entry. Again, no excuses. No one gets treated any better or worse, and no one gets a break because of whom they know. This will meet with opposition from many libertarians, including much of the RLC national leadership. So be it. As the Virginia state chair of the RLC, I’ll fight to see such a platform on this issue adopted at our national convention in a few months.

Purist libertarians will call me racist, classist, nativist, etc. That’s fine. Bring it on. I’m ready. My policy prescriptions here are buttressed by reality. Rhetoric doesn’t scare me, whether it comes from the left, or from libertarians of one stripe or another. As such, I proclaim it is the duty of every patriot to prevent ANY immigration policy from becoming law that gives amnesty, retards enforcement of existing immigration law, or gives out privileges or rewards to those here illegally. And please… stop referring to illegal aliens as ‘undocumented’ and the like. It just makes you look cowardly, and worse, politically correct.

6 responses

  1. * Many illegals didn’t sneak across the imaginary lines, but overstayed their visas instead. We might need some ID/policing methods you would oppose on principle.
    * Not all immigrants are hostile to conservatism. Here in Florida, the Vietnamese and Cuban businesses regularly play Fox News + support Republican politicians. And two Southern states are governed by children of Indian descent.
    * Illegals are a part of our economy, and not aside from it. If we’re angry at them for consuming resources and services, we should target our ire at businesses for dumping their problems on the rest of us. Pay people crap, encourage them to live in shanties (like what is at the edge of the citrus farms down here), and then wonder why they need to use up emergency room resources from poor health?

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    1. We might need some ID/policing methods you would oppose on principle.

      I don’t oppose them. I think it’s important to enforce our laws, protect our sovereignty, and quite frankly, our national security as well.

      Not all immigrants are hostile to conservatism. Here in Florida, the Vietnamese and Cuban businesses regularly play Fox News + support Republican politicians. And two Southern states are governed by children of Indian descent.

      Not all immigrants are illegal. I’m assuming if they have businesses and work hard to earn a living, they’re not living on handouts.

      Illegals are a part of our economy, and not aside from it.

      Yes and no. They are consumers. But at the same time they send billions back in remittances, on which they don’t pay federal or state taxes, they send their kids to schools, etc. The businesses pay them crap, because that is what they are willing to work for. Simple as that.

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  2. Another thing that needs to be fixed is the lumbering pace of the bureaucracy in processing their paperwork. for a “fee” (read bribe) immigrants can pay to “expedite” their paperwork faster through the system, This fee apparently puts them closer to the front of the line. It is nothing short of bribery and extortion. I know about this fee because my sister and brother-in-law were trying to help an immigrant friend of theirs navigate the system. If the president wants to expand the government, which I am against, then perhaps he sould expand the immigration and customs system to include more people to process the mountainous backlog of paperwork currently hindering the process. I agree with you, Rob. Everyone should come in the front door and wait their turn like everyone else. NO Amnesty. Better enforcement would be helpful too.

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    1. Heck, that’s what MY family did. Waited, hoped, filled out reams of paperwork, went in debt to pay all the fees.

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  3. All this “Undocumented” talk does bring up an interesting point. Will those in NY refusing to register their possessions with the state have illegal guns or undocumented guns? I’m thinking this would make a great comedy skit if it wasn’t so sad.

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  4. […] couple weeks back, I laid out my vision on the immigration issue. No amnesty, border security, one set of rules for everyone. Pretty straightforward stuff, even […]

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