New York & Company – another company that doesn’t know the meaning of customer service

I’ve been a fan of New York & Company for a long time. I freely admit I probably bought several thousand dollars’ worth of clothes from this company – both online and in various stores. The clothes are fairly well made and inexpensive, as well as nicely suited for office wear.

That’s why I’m supremely disappointed to report that New York & Company will not see a penny more of my money. Ever. Again.

I don’t know what it is with modern companies that don’t understand the meaning of customer service, but as far as I’m concerned, this is getting old. My one resolution for the new year is to ensure that I only shop at places that understand and honor that concept, and that I expose every last crappy company that doesn’t.

New York & Company is one of those.

On Black Friday, Teeny and Redhead decided to head to New York & Company at Tyson’s Corner to pick up a few gifts. I won’t even get into the shitstorm this caused, as they decided to head out at 0300 hrs. without mentioning it to mom. Beside the point…

After having bought some Christmas gifts and unpacking their bags, they realized that not only had the New York & Company sales associate forgotten to remove a security tag from one of Teeny’s purchases, but also that a $50 gift card that they bought and paid for was completely missing from the bag.

They realized it was Black Friday at 3 am, and the sales person was obviously tired, as she had given them the wrong change as well at the time of the purchase, so they weren’t too upset.  They just figured they would stop by and get another card.

A couple of weeks later, we stopped by the store together. Teeny explained the situation and presented her receipt. The security tag was removed. However, it appeared that the manager either didn’t know how to trace the gift card, or just didn’t believe my daughter when she said she never received the card! She told her she would look into the situation and to contact her in two days.

It has now been more than a month, and she STILL hasn’t gotten a new card or her money back! How difficult is it to trace a gift card and see if it was used – especially since she has the receipt and knows exactly when the purchase was made??? She called the store and was informed that they have no other information for her.

Essentially, she lost that money thanks to a tired or incompetent sales clerk, and nothing has been done about it to date!

This is appalling in any case, but even more unconscionable in this one, since Teeny is a minor and has a part time job where she works very hard. This was the first time she was able to buy presents for her family with her own money – money that she has earned, and thanks to this incompetence, she essentially LOST $50!

I emailed the above story to customer service as well as the comments section on NY&C’s website.

I got two replies – one asking for the sales receipt number, transaction number, etc. – information that the incompetent manager at the store already had, because she allegedly photocopied Teeny’s receipt – and the following from their customer service monkeys:

On Dec 22, 2012, at 18:16, “Michael Z.” <service@nyandcompany.com> wrote:

Dear Nicki,

Thank you for contacting http://www.nyandcompany.com.

We greatly appreciate your feedback.  We strive to provide an excellent shopping experience for each customer and constantly look for ways to improve.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused you and have forwarded your concern to our Retail Customer Service Department.  If you prefer to talk to someone in that department, please call (800) 723-5333.  You will need to choose option 2, then option 2.

You’ll find we’re always adding new products and offers, so please stop by http://www.nyandcompany.com again soon.  We appreciate your patronage.

Sincerely,

JoHari

NY&CO Customer Service
1-800-961-9906

Yeah, I’m thinking your appreciation of my “patronage” ain’t all that hot after this fiasco, but I decided to wait and see. After a few days of complete inaction, I sent them this:

— Original Message —
From: Nicki Fellenzer <n****@comcast.net>
Received: 12/24/12 6:51:17 PM EST
To: “Michael Z.” <service@nyandcompany.com>
Subject: Re: gift card

Well. It’s Christmas tomorrow and my daughter had to go out and buy another gift card just to make up for this screw up. She lost $50 thanks to this, and all I’ve gotten so far is a runaround including having to give information I have already provided about the receipt, which the manager of the store supposedly made a photocopy of.

This is absolutely inexcusable!

All those thousands I’ve spent at your stores and online? They will be spent elsewhere. I’m absolutely disgusted with the lack of action on this.

The “customer service” monkeys are obviously illiterate, or are trained to reply to every mail in the same manner:

Dear Nicki,

Thank you for contacting http://www.nyandcompany.com.

We greatly appreciate your feedback.  We strive to provide an excellent shopping experience for each customer and constantly look for ways to improve.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused you and have forwarded your concern to our Retail Customer Service Department.  Please allow additional time for a response.

You’ll find we’re always adding new products and offers, so please stop by http://www.nyandcompany.com again soon.  We appreciate your patronage.

Sincerely,
Lakeya

NY&CO Customer Service
1-800-961-9906

You appreciate my patronage, eh? Well, if you do, you’ve just lost it jackasses. After allowing for “additional time,” my final response to them was the following today:

As of today, I still have not heard anything about this gift card.

This was the store’s mistake. They failed to put the card in the bag at the time of purchase, and that was just ONE of the errors that was committed that day!

And yet, I have to go through all this rigamarole just to get a new card?

I am done with you. I am done with your company. And I promise you I will ensure that everyone I know, as well as all my blog readers are made aware of this issue!

You have lost a loyal customer. I hope you’re happy.

So here’s my advice to you: Shop elsewhere. This company obviously doesn’t give a damn about its customers, and while $50 is probably not a whole lot to them, it’s quite a bit to my daughter, who earned it, and for the first time in her life was able to get gifts for her loved ones with money she earned herself.

I’m sure New York & Company won’t go bankrupt from my publicizing this sole incident, but I can certainly ensure that everyone I know makes an informed choice about where to spend their hard-earned dollars.

3 responses

  1. This REALLY hits a nerve with me, Nicki. Years a go, when I was in charge of people. I told them all from day one, “If I receive just ONE legitimate complaint about you from our customer? You will be fired! No second chances. Period!”.
    It only took one firing to get the point across.
    I guess the silver lining here is that your daughter has learned early in life about the value of proper cutomer service.

    Happy New Year!

    Like

  2. Chris from Canada

    I am a big supporter of getting good customer service. One of the ways to ensure that is to reward good service when it is received by thanking the server, be it a cashier or waiter/ress, or gas pump attendant, or receptionist, or . . . I try to be friendly and happy as I go about my day and consequently, I find that peopple react in a positive manner. If I receive exceptional service, I will take a few minutes out of my busy schedule to contact the manager of a facility to tell them about my experience and compliment his staff.

    When poor service is encountered, I will generally forgive the first incident and give an opportunity to make good. If this happens (a positive response), then all is forgiven and back to business as usual. After all, everyone make the occasional mistake. If a problem either recurs or is not adequately responded to, then other measures must be taken. Complaints to higher authority, publication of the problem in local newspapers, boycotting of the establishment, possible legal action.

    What I find works the best is a letter or e-mail to a company’s customer service manager with the details of what transpired and what would satisfy you as a solution. Being reasonable and accomodating is good but also letting them get a glimpse of the iron fist inside the velvet glove works too. (sort of a “I think this is a solution which would mean THIS! would not have to happen).

    Good topic. Came here via a coment of yours on Rachel’s blog. I enjoyed reading a few of your posts here today for the first time. I’ll be back.

    Like

    1. Thanks Chris. I generally try to do the same. I’ve been a waitress and a bartender. That’s how I got though college. I will give anyone the benefit of the doubt.

      It takes some serious screw ups to get me to the point where I’ll blog about it. There’s just no excuse for ignoring your customers in this manner.

      Grrrrr.

      Thanks for stopping by and checking me out. Rachel is a good friend.

      Like

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